NURTURING 
THE
SOUL

ISAIAH 40:29-31

(KING JAMES VERSION)

NOVEMBER 2022

 
 

Background

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Isaiah 40:29-31

https://www.biblegateway.com/resources/matthew-henry/Isa.40.27-Isa.40.31

"2. He gives strength and power to his people, and helps them by enabling them to help themselves. He that is the strong God is the strength of Israel. (1.) He can help the weak, Isa. 40:29. Many a time he gives power to the faint, to those that are ready to faint away; and to those that have no might he not only gives, but increases strength, as there is more and more occasion for it. Many out of bodily weakness are wonderfully recovered, and made strong, by the providence of God: and many that are feeble in spirit, timorous and faint-hearted, unfit for services and sufferings, are yet strengthened by the grace of God with all might in the inward man. To those who are sensible of their weakness, and ready to acknowledge they have no might, God does in a special manner increase strength; for, when we are weak in ourselves, then are we strong in the Lord. (2.) He will help the willing, will help those who, in a humble dependence upon him, help themselves, and will do well for those who do their best, Isa. 40:30, 31. Those who trust to their own sufficiency, and are so confident of it that they neither exert themselves to the utmost nor seek unto God for his grace, are the youth and the young men, who are strong, but are apt to think themselves stronger than they are. And they shall faint and be weary, yea, they shall utterly fail in their services, in their conflicts, and under their burdens; they shall soon be made to see the folly of trusting to themselves. But those that wait on the Lord, who make conscience of their duty to him, and by faith rely upon him and commit themselves to his guidance, shall find that God will not fail them. [1.] They shall have grace sufficient for them: They shall renew their strength as their work is renewed, as there is new occasion; they shall be anointed, and their lamps supplied, with fresh oil. God will be their arm every morning, Isa. 33:2. If at any time they have been foiled and weakened they shall recover themselves, and so renew their strength. Heb. They shall change their strength, as their work is changed—doing work, suffering work; they shall have strength to labour, strength to wrestle, strength to resist, strength to bear. As the day so shall the strength be. [2.] They shall use this grace for the best purposes. Being strengthened, First, They shall soar upward, upward towards God: They shall mount up with wings like eagles, so strongly, so swiftly, so high and heaven-ward. In the strength of divine grace, their souls shall ascend above the world, and even enter into the holiest. Pious and devout affections are the eagles’ wings on which gracious souls mount up, Ps. 25:1. Secondly, They shall press forward, forward towards heaven. They shall walk, they shall run, the way of God’s commandments, cheerfully and with alacrity (they shall not be weary), constantly and with perseverance (they shall not faint); and therefore in due season they shall reap. Let Jacob and Israel therefore, in their greatest distresses, continue waiting upon God, and not despair of timely and effectual relief and succour from him."

 

NURTURING 
THE
SOUL

2 Corinthians 12:9-10

(KING JAMES VERSION)

OCTOBER 2022

 
 

Background

Matthew Henry's Commentary

2 Corinthians 12:9-10

https://www.biblegateway.com/resources/matthew-henry/2Cor.12.1-2Cor.12.10

"III. Here is the use which the apostle makes of this dispensation: He gloried in his infirmities (2 Cor. 12:9), and took pleasure in them, 2 Cor. 12:10. He does not mean his sinful infirmities (those we have reason to be ashamed of and grieved at), but he means his afflictions, his reproaches, necessities, persecutions, and distresses for Christ’s sake, 2 Cor. 12:10. And the reason of his glory and joy on account of these things was this—they were fair opportunities for Christ to manifest the power and sufficiency of his grace resting upon him, by which he had so much experience of the strength of divine grace that he could say, When I am weak, then am I strong. This is a Christian paradox: when we are weak in ourselves, then we are strong in the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ; when we see ourselves weak in ourselves, then we go out of ourselves to Christ, and are qualified to receive strength from him, and experience most of the supplies of divine strength and grace."

 

September 2022

Please join us in praying for the sick and bereaved families.

 

NURTURING 
THE
SOUL

ISAIAH 12

(KING JAMES VERSION)

AUGUST 2022

 
 

Background

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Isaiah 12

https://www.biblegateway.com/resources/matthew-henry/Isa.12.1-Isa.12.6

"The salvation promised in the foregoing chapter was compared to that of Israel “in the day that he came up out of the land of Egypt;” so that chapter ends. Now as Moses and the children of Israel then sang a song of praise to the glory of God (Exod. 15:1) so shall the people of God do in that day when the root of Jesse shall stand for an ensign of the people and shall be the desire and joy of all nations. In that day, I. Every particular believer shall sing a song of praise for his own interest in that salvation, Isa. 12:1, 2). “Thou shalt say, Lord, I will praise thee.” Thanksgiving-work shall be closet-work. II. Many in concert shall join in praising God for the common benefit arising from this salvation (Isa. 12:4-6): “You shall say, Praise you the Lord.” Thanksgiving-work shall be congregation-work; and the praises of God shall be publicly sung in the congregations of the upright."

 

NURTURING 
THE
SOUL

PSALM 105:1-15 

(NEW INTERNATIONAL VERSION)

JULY 2022

 
 

Background

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Psalm 105

https://www.biblegateway.com/resources/matthew-henry/Ps.105.1-Ps.105.45

"Some of the psalms of praise are very short, others very long, to teach us that, in our devotions, we should be more observant how our hearts work than how the time passes and neither overstretch ourselves by coveting to be long nor over-stint ourselves by coveting to be short, but either the one or the other as we find in our hearts to pray. This is a long psalm; the general scope is the same with most of the psalms, to set forth the glory of God, but the subject-matter is particular. Every time we come to the throne of grace we may, if we please, furnish ourselves out of the word of God (out of the history of the New Testament, as this out of the history of the Old) with new songs, with fresh thoughts—so copious, so various, so inexhaustible is the subject. In the foregoing psalm we are taught to praise God for his wondrous works of common providence with reference to the world in general. In this we are directed to praise him for his special favours to his church."

 

NURTURING 
THE
SOUL

ROMANS 8:1-13

(NEW INTERNATIONAL VERSION)

JUNE 2022

 
 

Background

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Romans 8

https://www.biblegateway.com/resources/matthew-henry/Rom.8.1-Rom.8.39

"The apostle, having fully explained the doctrine of justification, and pressed the necessity of sanctification, in this chapter applies himself to the consolation of the Lord’s people. Ministers are helpers of the joy of the saints. 'Comfort ye, comfort ye my people,' so runs our commission, Isa. 40:1. It is the will of God that his people should be a comforted people. And we have here such a draught of the gospel charter, such a display of the unspeakable privileges of true believers, as may furnish us with abundant matter for joy and peace in believing, that by all these immutable things, in which it is impossible for God to lie, we might have strong consolation. Many of the people of God have, accordingly, found this chapter a well-spring of comfort to their souls, living and dying, and have sucked and been satisfied from these breasts of consolation, and with joy drawn water out of these wells of salvation."

 

NURTURING 
THE
SOUL

PROVERBS 3:1-6

(NEW INTERNATIONAL VERSION)

MAY 2022

 
 

Background

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Proverbs 3

https://www.biblegateway.com/resources/matthew-henry/Prov.3.1-Prov.3.35

"This chapter is one of the most excellent in all this book, both for argument to persuade us to be religious and for directions therein.

I. We must be constant to our duty because that is the way to be happy, Prov. 3:1-4.

II. We must live a life of dependence upon God because that is the way to be safe, Prov. 3:5."

 

NURTURING 
THE
SOUL

PSALM 121

(NEW INTERNATIONAL VERSION)

APRIL 2022

 
 

Background

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Psalm 121

https://www.biblegateway.com/resources/matthew-henry/Ps.121.1-Ps.121.8

"Some call this the soldier’s psalm, and think it was penned in the camp, when David was hazarding his life in the high places of the field, and thus trusted God to cover his head in the day of battle. Others call it the traveller’s psalm (for there is nothing in it of military dangers) and think David penned it when he was going abroad, and designed it pro vehiculo—for the carriage, for a good man’s convoy and companion in a journey or voyage. But we need not thus appropriate it; wherever we are, at home or abroad, we are exposed to danger more than we are aware of; and this psalm directs and encourages us to repose ourselves and our confidence in God, and by faith to put ourselves under his protection and commit ourselves to his care, which we must do, with an entire resignation and satisfaction, in singing this psalm. I. David here assures himself of help from God, Ps. 121:1, 2. II. He assures others of it, Ps. 121:3-8."

 

NURTURING 
THE
SOUL

I KINGS 17:2-6

(NEW INTERNATIONAL VERSION)

MARCH 2022

 
 

Background

Matthew Henry's Commentary

I Kings 17

https://www.biblegateway.com/resources/matthew-henry/1Kgs.17.1-1Kgs.17.7

"Elijah had but one meal brought him at a time, every morning and every evening, to teach him not to take thought for the morrow. Let those who have but from hand to mouth learn to live upon Providence, and trust it for the bread of the day in the day; thank God for bread this day, and let to-morrow bring bread with it."

 

NURTURING
THE
SOUL

PSALM 91

(KING JAMES VERSION)

FEBRUARY 2022

 
PSALM 91.jpg
 

BACKGROUND

"Some of the ancients were of opinion that Moses was the penman, not only of the foregoing psalm, which is expressly said to be his, but also of the eight that next follow it; but that cannot be, for Ps. 95:1-11 is expressly said to be penned by David, and long after Moses, Heb. 4:7. It is probable that this psalm also was penned by David; it is a writ of protection for all true believers, not in the name of king David, or under his broad seal; he needed it himself, especially if the psalm was penned, as some conjecture it was, at the time of the pestilence which was sent for his numbering the people; but in the name of the King of kings, and under the broad seal of Heaven. Observe, I. The psalmist’s own resolution to take God for his keeper (Ps. 91:2), from which he gives both direction and encouragement to others, Ps. 91:9. II. The promises which are here made, in God’s name, to all those that do so in sincerity. 1. They shall be taken under the peculiar care of Heaven, Ps. 91:1, 4. 2. They shall be delivered from the malice of the powers of darkness (Ps. 91:3, 5, 6), and that by a distinguishing preservation, Ps. 91:7, 8. 3. They shall be the charge of the holy angels, Ps. 91:10-12. 4. They shall triumph over their enemies, Ps. 91:13. 5. They shall be the special favourites of God himself, Ps. 91:14-16. In singing this we must shelter ourselves under, and then solace ourselves in, the divine protection. Many think that to Christ, as Mediator, these promises do primarily belong (Isa. 49:2), not because to him the devil applied one of these promises (Matt. 4:6), but because to him they are very applicable, and, coming through him, they are more sweet and sure to all believers."

 

NURTURING
THE
SOUL

PSALM 23

(KING JAMES VERSION)

JANUARY 2022

 
Psalm 23 KJV - Made with PosterMyWall (1).jpg
 

BACKGROUND

"Many of David’s psalms are full of complaints, but this is full of comforts, and the expressions of delight in God’s great goodness and dependence upon him. It is a psalm which has been sung by good Christians, and will be while the world stands, with a great deal of pleasure and satisfaction. I. The psalmist here claims relation to God, as his shepherd, Ps. 23:1. II. He recounts his experience of the kind things God had done for him as his shepherd, Ps. 23:2, 3, 5. III. Hence he infers that he should want no good (Ps. 23:1), that he needed to fear no evil (Ps. 23:4), that God would never leave nor forsake him in a way of mercy; and therefore he resolves never to leave nor forsake God in a way of duty, Ps. 23:6. In this he had certainly an eye, not only to the blessings of God’s providence, which made his outward condition prosperous, but to the communications of God’s grace, received by a lively faith, and returned in a warm devotion, which filled his soul with joy unspeakable. And, as in the foregoing psalm he represented Christ dying for his sheep, so here he represents Christians receiving the benefit of all the care and tenderness of that great and good shepherd."