NURTURING 
THE
SOUL

PROVERBS 3:1-6

(NEW INTERNATIONAL VERSION)

MAY 2022

 
 

Background

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Proverbs 3

https://www.biblegateway.com/resources/matthew-henry/Prov.3.1-Prov.3.35

"This chapter is one of the most excellent in all this book, both for argument to persuade us to be religious and for directions therein.

I. We must be constant to our duty because that is the way to be happy, Prov. 3:1-4.

II. We must live a life of dependence upon God because that is the way to be safe, Prov. 3:5."

 

NURTURING 
THE
SOUL

PSALM 121

(NEW INTERNATIONAL VERSION)

APRIL 2022

 
 

Background

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Psalm 121

https://www.biblegateway.com/resources/matthew-henry/Ps.121.1-Ps.121.8

"Some call this the soldier’s psalm, and think it was penned in the camp, when David was hazarding his life in the high places of the field, and thus trusted God to cover his head in the day of battle. Others call it the traveller’s psalm (for there is nothing in it of military dangers) and think David penned it when he was going abroad, and designed it pro vehiculo—for the carriage, for a good man’s convoy and companion in a journey or voyage. But we need not thus appropriate it; wherever we are, at home or abroad, we are exposed to danger more than we are aware of; and this psalm directs and encourages us to repose ourselves and our confidence in God, and by faith to put ourselves under his protection and commit ourselves to his care, which we must do, with an entire resignation and satisfaction, in singing this psalm. I. David here assures himself of help from God, Ps. 121:1, 2. II. He assures others of it, Ps. 121:3-8."

 

NURTURING 
THE
SOUL

I KINGS 17:2-6

(NEW INTERNATIONAL VERSION)

MARCH 2022

 
 

Background

Matthew Henry's Commentary

I Kings 17

https://www.biblegateway.com/resources/matthew-henry/1Kgs.17.1-1Kgs.17.7

"Elijah had but one meal brought him at a time, every morning and every evening, to teach him not to take thought for the morrow. Let those who have but from hand to mouth learn to live upon Providence, and trust it for the bread of the day in the day; thank God for bread this day, and let to-morrow bring bread with it."

 

NURTURING
THE
SOUL

PSALM 91

(KING JAMES VERSION)

FEBRUARY 2022

 
PSALM 91.jpg
 

BACKGROUND

"Some of the ancients were of opinion that Moses was the penman, not only of the foregoing psalm, which is expressly said to be his, but also of the eight that next follow it; but that cannot be, for Ps. 95:1-11 is expressly said to be penned by David, and long after Moses, Heb. 4:7. It is probable that this psalm also was penned by David; it is a writ of protection for all true believers, not in the name of king David, or under his broad seal; he needed it himself, especially if the psalm was penned, as some conjecture it was, at the time of the pestilence which was sent for his numbering the people; but in the name of the King of kings, and under the broad seal of Heaven. Observe, I. The psalmist’s own resolution to take God for his keeper (Ps. 91:2), from which he gives both direction and encouragement to others, Ps. 91:9. II. The promises which are here made, in God’s name, to all those that do so in sincerity. 1. They shall be taken under the peculiar care of Heaven, Ps. 91:1, 4. 2. They shall be delivered from the malice of the powers of darkness (Ps. 91:3, 5, 6), and that by a distinguishing preservation, Ps. 91:7, 8. 3. They shall be the charge of the holy angels, Ps. 91:10-12. 4. They shall triumph over their enemies, Ps. 91:13. 5. They shall be the special favourites of God himself, Ps. 91:14-16. In singing this we must shelter ourselves under, and then solace ourselves in, the divine protection. Many think that to Christ, as Mediator, these promises do primarily belong (Isa. 49:2), not because to him the devil applied one of these promises (Matt. 4:6), but because to him they are very applicable, and, coming through him, they are more sweet and sure to all believers."

 

NURTURING
THE
SOUL

PSALM 23

(KING JAMES VERSION)

JANUARY 2022

 
Psalm 23 KJV - Made with PosterMyWall (1).jpg
 

BACKGROUND

"Many of David’s psalms are full of complaints, but this is full of comforts, and the expressions of delight in God’s great goodness and dependence upon him. It is a psalm which has been sung by good Christians, and will be while the world stands, with a great deal of pleasure and satisfaction. I. The psalmist here claims relation to God, as his shepherd, Ps. 23:1. II. He recounts his experience of the kind things God had done for him as his shepherd, Ps. 23:2, 3, 5. III. Hence he infers that he should want no good (Ps. 23:1), that he needed to fear no evil (Ps. 23:4), that God would never leave nor forsake him in a way of mercy; and therefore he resolves never to leave nor forsake God in a way of duty, Ps. 23:6. In this he had certainly an eye, not only to the blessings of God’s providence, which made his outward condition prosperous, but to the communications of God’s grace, received by a lively faith, and returned in a warm devotion, which filled his soul with joy unspeakable. And, as in the foregoing psalm he represented Christ dying for his sheep, so here he represents Christians receiving the benefit of all the care and tenderness of that great and good shepherd."